Entering The Comal

Sometimes, entering the Comal can be just as challenging as the tubing itself. This is because of the great deal of tubers that are always trying to get in on the tubing fun from the beginning of the summer to its end.

Therefore, knowing the optimal spots to enter the Comal can go a long way towards easing your tubing experience. It’s not uncommon to have to wait in a line to enter the river, whether at an entry spot itself or in a tube rental facility.

Picking the right entry spot for you

If you are finding yourself at the wrong end of long lines forming in front of the Comal, you might want to consider another point of entry. Despite its relative shortness, the river is still long enough for one to comfortably enter through several spots and still have as much fun as possible.

If the standard entry is too crowded, consider driving to either Prince Solms Park or Hinman Island. Aside from being great picnic ventures, these parks both offer not only an entry point into the river but also a spot alongside the river where tubers can stop in order to rest. However, both of these parks can get very crowded during peak tubing times, especially Hinman Island. Parking can also be quite an issue here, so you might only have luck using one of these two parks if you are making your way there on a motorbike or bicycle or, alternatively, by foot.

Using shuttles for a speedy arrival

You can also use the shuttle provided by some of the tube rental companies. If this interests you, choose to rent a tube from a company that also offers shuttle services as part of their package. Once you have rented a tube, this shuttle will offer to take you, your family and friends as well as several other tubers to an appropriate entry spot where you will be able to easily enter the river.

Comal River

 

Comal River has long been considered one of New Braunfels’ gems and it is often the reason why tourists visit the city; often, everything else will be secondary. This is due to the fact that the river is an immensely popular tubing destination, providing a tubing experience like few other places in Texas.

Why everyone loves the Comal

Deemed the „longest shortest river in the world“, the Comal River instills pride in New Braunfels’ residents because of how clean it is and how many opportunities it presents. Tubing is, by far, the most popular activity on the river, and it seemingly hosts an endless amount of tubers each summer. These people come not just from all over the U.S. but also the world in order to know the charm of this delightful river.

Because of its always-cool temperature, the river is an ideal point for those looking to cool off from the very hot summers that New Braunfels and all of Texas are often known for. Aside from tubing, one can only do this by swimming, diving or even kayaking down the river, as these are also popular activities on the Comal.

The river is fed by the beautiful Comal Springs, giving it a steady flow rate even in the face of the possibility of rainfall. The combination of Native American treasure that was dropped in the springs and found its way into the river with the many valuables that tubers drop make the aforementioned diving a surprisingly popular activity for opportunists, both in the form of snorkeling as well as scuba diving.

Why the Comal is the river to be at

With how the Guadalupe has dried up in recent times, the Comal became an even more preferred choice for water recreationists in the area, almost making a visit to it mandatory. Even during the winter season, the Comal continues to offer residents and visitors alike something in the form of a beautiful sight they can marvel at.

Comal River Water Conditions

 

The Comal River is known for its steady water conditions that facilitate pleasant tubing throughout the warmer seasons. Unlike the oft-unpredictable conditions of the Guadalupe, where recreationists looking for thrills used to gather more often, the Comal offers steady water flow at almost all times.

Steady flow rate year-round

Aside from the constantly cool temperature regardless of how hot the weather is, the Comal also boasts a steady flow rate, never running too fast for anyone’s liking. Despite this, it’s still a great river for those looking to stay constantly on the move, seemingly always flowing at just the right speed.

Even during times of water, the Comal is never really under any danger of being flooded, and tubers can quickly return to their favorite activity once the pour ends. Comal’s reliable flow rate makes it popular not only for tubing but also for swimmers of different aptitude.

Keeping an eye out for rain

During times of rain, however, the water can threaten to go up to a thousand cubic feet per second, at which point the surface of the water ceases to be safe for people. Authorities will usually discourage anyone from entering the river when there is such a flow, and have been known to close the river when the flow exceeds a thousand cubic feet per second. These dangerous flow rates not only make the river unstable but also carry debris throughout the river that could injure recreationists in the area.

Fortunately, rainfall rarely causes the river’s flow rate to reach a thousand or several thousand cubic feet per seconds, especially during the summer when tubing is most popular. Because of this, the Comal has been a prime choice for tubers and water recreationists looking for a reliable river to cool off in when it’s hot, and will likely continue being one for a while.

Comal River Rules 2015

 

In order to ensure each and every tuber gets to have their own fun at the Comal, the county has imposed certain rules and regulations for everyone to follow while at the river. These rules don’t take away from any fun you might have but rather look to create an environment in which everyone can enjoy themselves.

Comal’s cleanliness is the primary concern

Perhaps the most important thing to keep in mind is that you aren’t allowed to litter the Comal in any way. While the „can ban“ has been lifted and you are now free to bring your refreshments to the river, you must do in a container in which you will dispose of the empty cans and bottles afterwards. Glass bottles are also not allowed as glass shards might endanger tubers, swimmers and divers alike.

To prevent pollution, nothing containing or made of styrofoam can be brought on the Comal either. Since the Comal prides itself on having a beautiful and rich flora and fauna, these materials might damage the eco-environment and reduce the quality of life of those species inhabiting the river.

Other rules to follow

Another thing to keep in mind for tubers and kayakers is the size of their floatation devices. Tubes are meant to be no larger than five feet in diameter while kayaks must not exceed eighteen feet in length. This will prevent any tuber or kayaker from ruining the fun of others by having a floatation device too large in size.

Visitors to the Comal also aren’t allowed to jump into the river, be it from trees, bridges or anything other that might support a person. While this might seem fun to the person doing the jumping, it can not only put them at risk of fatal injury but can also put others on the river at risk – something that everyone should look to avoid at all times. Lastly, there are also regulations dictating that no noise produced on the river can extend past fifty feet in any direction, preventing any one person from creating a considerable disturbance.